Show where a Python package is used

June 12, 2015

A while back I was doing some spring cleaning of my Python packages. I noticed that there were a bunch of packages that I couldn’t recall installing. I wanted to know if I could safely remove them, so I wrote a simple bash script to tell me called pip-uses.

Source

Rather than post the source here and let it get more out of date every time I change it, you can find the source on GitHub. It’s in my bin repository, where I keep my notable helper scripts; feel free to poke around.

Motivations

I was primarily influenced by Homebrew’s brew uses command. It does a nice job of giving you exactly the information you want, and I think the way the command is named makes sense.

Homebrew: brew uses
$ brew uses --installed pango
imagemagick

pip-uses gives you basically the experience:

Pip: pip-uses
$ pip-uses stevedore
virtualenvwrapper

In this example, the Python package virtualenvwrapper uses stevedore, just as imagemagick uses pango. Both commands can save you from accidentally removing a crucial dependency and answer the burning question, “How in the world did this thing get installed?”

Wish List

I’m not doing much Python development these days, but if I had some spare time I’d love for the script to also have these features:

If you find this script useful and end up implementing one of these feature or more on top of pip-uses, be sure to send me a Pull Request!

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